Spending a Day (and a Kidney) at the Snow

on . .

avondale school principals blog

 
 

Spending a Day (and a Kidney) at the Snow

28 July 2017

 
 

Spending a Day (and a Kidney) at the Snow

 

During the recent winter school holidays I had the privilege of spending a day (and a kidney) at the snow. We were lucky enough—or so we thought—to have it snowing for most of the day. With the snow came fog, mist and cloud that created a full white-out. The kind of white-out where you couldn’t see the beginning of the runs, you couldn’t see the contours of the snow beneath you, and you couldn’t even see the people you were skiing with!

 

However, given we only had the one day we didn’t let the less-than-optimal conditions deter us, and off we went! By mid-morning we’d found a comfortable run that was bordered by trees, which helped frame the actual skiing route. With much enthusiasm, four of us headed off down the trail … or so we thought! After a short time of skiing through the white-out I noticed that we were skiing over a lot of plants, grass, through trees, and it slowly dawned on me, that we were no longer on a groomed run. We stopped to survey our surroundings. NOTHING. We couldn’t see or hear ANY other people and when we looked back up the hill from where we assumed we had come from, we couldn’t see further than 10-15m. It was strangely eerie. We had no idea where we had come from or which way to head. One of our party suggested calling the Skidoo for help, mostly I think hoping for a fun, free ride. Luckily with modern technology we were able to phone the rest of our group and let them know that we were okay, well okay-ish, and would call again if we couldn’t find the trail soon.

 

We managed to walk, fall and ski our way to where we thought our white wilderness would join up with the main trail and luckily after some traversing we saw two faint silhouettes in the distance. People! We just hoped they weren’t as lost as us! Fortunately they were near the main trail and we were soon skiing back on track, having a great time, almost as though nothing had happened.

 

This scenario, which could have been quite serious, got me thinking about why I wasn’t more panicked at the time. I came to a few conclusions: Connection—I wasn’t alone, our small group managed to stay together and could support each other with advice and ideas to solve our problem. Communication—even though we couldn’t see help, we had a phone with signal. This was our lifeline to call for serious help had we really needed it. Growth through sharing—I knew once we were okay that the ‘adventure’ would at least be a good story! Sharing our life experiences and stories allows us to make personal connections and provides an opportunity to grow from the mistakes and experiences of others.

 

Similarly, we hope as a Parents and Friends group that we can offer our school and community an opportunity to connect, communicate and to grow with others.

 
 

Nadine Dunne

Parents & Friends Team

 

 
 
 

avondale school newsletter

 
 
 

avondale school newsletter

Early Years

avondale school newsletter

Get Active

avondale school newsletter

Vacation Care

 
 

book a tour slate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

}); })(jQuery);